Gravatlarge Understanding of Herenowium

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Gravatlarge Understanding of Herenowium

Postby muon200 » Thu Dec 25, 2014 6:58 pm

The universe is full of space-time continuum called Herenowium. It diffuses to make gravity effective at long range with only local causes. the Immaterial fluidity of Herenowium is free for us to feel, to shrink, to grow.

A distant star attracts us, not because of a long range field line. It is a local flow of Herenowium which is conformally flowing everywhere and to that star. It is a local effect of protons that they are at rest relative to the local Herenowium. If the distant star has shrunk vast spaces, then that shrinkage is in superposition at your hadron so it falls to that star.

It is a local accounting and acceleration dogma which satisfies a simplistic need to get on with it. The impacts that change inertial motion also drag Herenowium, as reciprocal effects of gravity accelerate a hadron while it remains at rest relative to the local Herenowium. That is how I wish the world worked. And it does.

The Gravatlarge Understanding
The ocean of Herenowium has many coves and distant secret cozy spots which we can never visit. They have a gravity for us, but it is not a field. It is an ocean that is diffusing around with strict accounting for conservation, laminar flow, and constant availability of an infinity of velocity ether components for hadrons to ride.

Gravity is a large concern and a big presence everywhere. It carries imperative diffusion flows that we follow powerlessly. Herenowium permeates all matter with impunity. Star heat cannot wither Herenowium. The star's billion degree protons shrink space and grow time. That is gravity. The flow of diffusion is not burned up, no it is above reproach. It is an eternal ghost of all the universe, providing for our reality. Praise Grav At Large for its freely given gravity. I like time.
muon200
 
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