Theory of Fermion Masses: Revamped neutrinos and beta decay

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Theory of Fermion Masses: Revamped neutrinos and beta decay

Postby Yablon » Wed Nov 07, 2018 8:03 pm

To all:

It has been a couple of months since I last posted. A new draft is linked here:

https://jayryablon.files.wordpress.com/ ... s-4-0a.pdf

Since my last post I have advanced my paper on Kaluza-Klein and fermion masses in several ways.

1) I have fully revamped the neutrino mass section which is in section 19. This should a be final cut, and I am quite sure I have finally predicted these masses correctly. (The masses here are different than the ones I predicted last time -- I found experimental data about square mass differences that I was not fully cognizant of last time.)

2) I have expanded section 20 which contains the second Higgs boson prediction to review the exact manner in which the fermion mass results reduce 22 independent physics parameters in the natural world down to 11 parameters.

3) Section 21 adds the Lagrangian potential and plots for leptons. I was aware of the 50 TeV+ energies a couple of month ago, and have been wresting since with how to understand them.

4) Very importantly, in the process of trying to understand these 50 TeV+ energies, I have spent most of past few weeks writing brand new section 22, which as titled, explains "How Weak Beta Decays are Triggered by Neutrinos and Antineutrinos Interacting with Electrons, Neutrons and Protons via the Z Boson-Mediated Weak Neutral Current, with 'Chiral Polarization' of Electrons." This 25-page section could be a paper by itself. Bottom line: This is how beta decay really works and why beta decay lifetimes are what they are. The main reason for this post at this time is because I wanted to immediately put this new knowledge into the public domain as soon as I had it coherently written down on paper. As you will see, this ties together several disparate threads in our current state of knowledge, and really puts a microscope on what neutrinos are actually up to. Those little rascals! :D As you will see, neutrons and protons are actually neutrino detectors. Every beta decay event is actually the detection of a neutrino or antineutrino.

5) I have restructured the entire paper to make it a paper about fermion masses which one is able to understand based on Dirac-Klauza-Klein (DKK) Theory, rather than a paper about how DKK happens to lead to a theory of Fermion masses. Partly toward that end, and to prepare for submitting this now-160 page paper for referee review by the end of the year, I have added a preface including a "reader guide" intended for people who are very careful about the time they spend on a paper until they are sure their time is being well-spent.

I still need to add a section to regarding how the 50 TeV+ energies required for lepton beta-decay in Figures 12-15 in section 21 are obtained. Answer: fluctuations in the Planck quantum vacuum using the Planck-scale Higgs field of (13.4) through (13.6) that I set aside to spend sections 14-22 working with the fermions as we observe them in the Fermi vacuum. This is where Newtons's gravitational enters particle physics, and thus how gravitation influences what we observe in particle physics.

Happy reading!

Jay
Yablon
Independent Physics Researcher
 
Posts: 267
Joined: Tue Feb 04, 2014 9:39 pm
Location: New York

Re: Theory of Fermion Masses: Revamped neutrinos and beta de

Postby Yablon » Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:05 pm

All,

I uploaded a draft with a few more changes to https://jayryablon.files.wordpress.com/ ... s-4-0e.pdf.

If you already looked at what I posted yesterday, start at page 157 and read to the end. I added about three pages regarding the neutron beam experiments, anisotropy of the CvB background, and the pedagogy of how we should think about atoms and nucei in the CvB background.

Best,

Jay
Yablon
Independent Physics Researcher
 
Posts: 267
Joined: Tue Feb 04, 2014 9:39 pm
Location: New York


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