Pedagogical proofs of Bell's theorem

Foundations of physics and/or philosophy of physics, and in particular, posts on unresolved or controversial issues

Re: Pedagogical proofs of Bell's theorem

Postby Joy Christian » Tue Sep 14, 2021 7:46 am

Heinera wrote:
FrediFizzx wrote:What more does one need to know other than it is mathematically impossible for anything to exceed the inequalities! You Bell fans always choke on that simple fact.
.

So, what inequality do you think applies to the CHSH urn experiment?

There is no such thing as a "CHSH urn experiment."

Moreover, Bell's so-called "theorem" is nothing but a statistical swindle.
.
Joy Christian
Research Physicist
 
Posts: 2793
Joined: Wed Feb 05, 2014 4:49 am
Location: Oxford, United Kingdom

Re: Pedagogical proofs of Bell's theorem

Postby gill1109 » Tue Sep 14, 2021 7:59 am

Joy Christian wrote:
Heinera wrote:
FrediFizzx wrote:What more does one need to know other than it is mathematically impossible for anything to exceed the inequalities! You Bell fans always choke on that simple fact.
.

So, what inequality do you think applies to the CHSH urn experiment?

There is no such thing as a "CHSH urn experiment."

Moreover, Bell's so-called "theorem" is nothing but a statistical swindle.

Boole’s three correlation theorem is a swindle!? (Necessity and sufficiency of Bell’s three correlations inequalities). And Fine’s four correlations theorem? (Necessity and sufficiency of CHSH inequalities).

Of course there a CHSH urn experiment. Put eight slips of paper in an urn. Pick one at random. Toss two fair coins. The coins determine Alice and Bob’s setting 1 or setting 2. Call them a and b.

Each slip of paper has four numbers +/-1 written on it. Call them: x1, x2, y1, y2. Report outcomes: xa, yb.

Return slip of paper to urn, repeat…

This thought experiment can be performed in a classroom. It can be simulated on a computer. It can be studied mathematically using standard tools from probability theory and mathematical statistics.

Here are the eight slips of paper, using “0” and “1” to stand for “-1” and “+1” respectively:

"0000"
"0100"
"0110"
"1110"
"0001"
"1001"
"1011"
"1111"

Of course, you can fill the urn in other ways; and you can choose settings using biased coins or even correlated coins, if you like. The special “eight slip” urn I mentioned will give three correlations of +0.5 and one of -0.5, so a value of “S” of 2. In the limit of large N.
gill1109
Mathematical Statistician
 
Posts: 2812
Joined: Tue Feb 04, 2014 10:39 pm
Location: Leiden

Re: Pedagogical proofs of Bell's theorem

Postby FrediFizzx » Tue Sep 14, 2021 9:05 am

Joy Christian wrote:
Heinera wrote:
FrediFizzx wrote:What more does one need to know other than it is mathematically impossible for anything to exceed the inequalities! You Bell fans always choke on that simple fact.
.

So, what inequality do you think applies to the CHSH urn experiment?

There is no such thing as a "CHSH urn experiment."

Moreover, Bell's so-called "theorem" is nothing but a statistical swindle.

What else do the Bell fanatics have to do now other than talk about irrelevant junk now that they are all shot down? :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :lol:
.
FrediFizzx
Independent Physics Researcher
 
Posts: 2905
Joined: Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:12 pm
Location: N. California, USA

Previous

Return to Sci.Physics.Foundations

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: ahrefs [Bot] and 9 guests

CodeCogs - An Open Source Scientific Library