Simulation with non-local behavior

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Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby FrediFizzx » Sun Feb 09, 2020 1:48 pm

Looks like it might be possible to predict individual outcomes event by event with grossly non-local behavior. It is a non-local hidden variable model with 720 degrees of data at 1 degree resolution.

Image

Here is a PDF of the Mathematica simulation,

EPRsims/non-local.pdf

The only problem with this is that output A is a coin toss variable. So you have to know a, b, lambda and A to predict the correct outcome for B. Don't know if this actually relates to quantum mechanics in any way.
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Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby FrediFizzx » Sun Feb 09, 2020 2:37 pm

Well..., we can just do A the regular way implementing the polarizer function where e is the A particle vector. So if you know a, b, e and lambda, you can predict the A and B outcomes. Here is the updated code.

EPRsims/non-local2.pdf
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Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby Joy Christian » Sun Feb 09, 2020 2:44 pm

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This is of course not surprising. In 1964 Bell already noted that nonlocal models can reproduce the strong correlation:

Image
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Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby FrediFizzx » Sun Feb 09, 2020 3:04 pm

Joy Christian wrote:***
This is of course not surprising. In 1964 Bell already noted that nonlocal models can reproduce the strong correlation:

Image
***

Not quite the same thing. We can predict the individual A and B outcomes event by event to produce -a.b. Plus this is a HV non-local model. I mainly did this simulation to see if there might be a clue for local behavior.
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Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby Joy Christian » Sun Feb 09, 2020 3:31 pm

FrediFizzx wrote:
Joy Christian wrote:***
This is of course not surprising. In 1964 Bell already noted that nonlocal models can reproduce the strong correlation:

Image
***

Not quite the same thing. We can predict the individual A and B outcomes event by event to produce -a.b. Plus this is a HV non-local model. I mainly did this simulation to see if there might be a clue for local behavior.

It is the same thing. Bell's local model of 1964 he is referring to in the above paragraph predicts individual A and B outcomes event-by-event. About ten years ago someone simulated its nonlocal version for me to convince me that only nonlocal models can reproduce the -a.b correlations, and rather easily. I continued working on my 3-sphere model regardless.

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Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby FrediFizzx » Sun Feb 09, 2020 5:30 pm

Joy Christian wrote:… It is the same thing. Bell's local model of 1964 he is referring to in the above paragraph predicts individual A and B outcomes event-by-event. About ten years ago someone simulated its nonlocal version for me to convince me that only nonlocal models can reproduce the -a.b correlations, and rather easily. I continued working on my 3-sphere model regardless.

***

It looks like to me that with Bell's configuration, you will get straight lines event by event instead of the negative cosine curve. Bell's HV is just the particle spin vector. You need this function,



with lambda random 0 to 1 to produce the negative cosine curve. But it is complete nonsense anyways. Not only does station B know A's angle, it also knows A's outcome. Very un-Natural.
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Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby Guest » Mon Feb 10, 2020 12:16 am

FrediFizzx wrote:It looks like to me that with Bell's configuration, you will get straight lines event by event instead of the negative cosine curve. Bell's HV is just the particle spin vector. You need this function,

with lambda random 0 to 1 to produce the negative cosine curve. But it is complete nonsense anyway. Not only does station B know A's angle, but it also knows A's outcome. Very un-Natural.

I like your model, Fred. It's elegant, one of the most elegant of this type that I have seen.

Some other people with models like this, but much more complex, are Anthony Crofts (Illinois) and David Oaknin (Haifa).
http://www.life.illinois.edu/crofts/
http://www.life.illinois.edu/crofts/Bell_Ineq/
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Oaknin
https://arxiv.org/abs/1411.5704
Guest
 

Re: Simulation with non-local behavior

Postby FrediFizzx » Mon Feb 10, 2020 2:45 pm

Guest wrote:
FrediFizzx wrote:It looks like to me that with Bell's configuration, you will get straight lines event by event instead of the negative cosine curve. Bell's HV is just the particle spin vector. You need this function,

with lambda random 0 to 1 to produce the negative cosine curve. But it is complete nonsense anyway. Not only does station B know A's angle, but it also knows A's outcome. Very un-Natural.

I like your model, Fred. It's elegant, one of the most elegant of this type that I have seen.

Some other people with models like this, but much more complex, are Anthony Crofts (Illinois) and David Oaknin (Haifa).
http://www.life.illinois.edu/crofts/
http://www.life.illinois.edu/crofts/Bell_Ineq/
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Oaknin
https://arxiv.org/abs/1411.5704

Thanks. It is probably the most simple non-local HV model that can produce the negative cosine curve event by event and completely predictable if you know all the 4 variables. The simple function is adapted from Vongehr's QRC quantum model. I had to divide (b - a) by 2 to get it to work properly. You can see from the plot that the tails of the curve didn't quite come in all the way. I suspect that is just due to there not being enough data for complete averaging as you can see from what I did at the end of the code. But this gives me some ideas to try for a local HV model.

Oaknin's model is ridiculously complex and it looks like the HV's depend somewhat on (b - a). I will check out what Crofts did.
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